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Friday, June 22nd, 2012

Most people have a an incorrect understanding of how the New testament has been translated through the years. I drew this to show graphically how it has occurred. Hope it helps!


9 Comments
GoodNews
If you are interested in a more detailed explanation of this process this is a great summary article. http://www.str.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=6068
Good News   Friday, June 22, 2012
RAGrise
Richie studied Greek in college and uses the Greek bible more often than any other translation. We have a friend who lived in Isreal for 30 years. Between the two of them I have learned so much about culture and language that my perception and understanding of the bible has grown leaps and bounds! There is so much that the average american just does not know.
Richie & Ashley   Friday, June 22, 2012
hawkwolf
We have had discussions about this subject in our SS Class for the longest time, off and on; however, the most difficult to emphasize to some people is that when you get to translation, at the present time we are getting the result of what the people that were financing the endeavor were willing to pay for and how they wanted it to turn out for whatever purpose. The National Geographic had a very good article on the King James Bible in the December, 2011 Issue.
BeanCounter37   Sunday, June 24, 2012
GoodNews
That's a bunch of hogwash and false ideas that many like Bart Erhman Elaine Pagels and John Crossan spout in effort to discredit the Bible. If the church leaders in the days of Nicea, or the Council of Trent, or the days of the King James Bible left out or changed things they didn't like or added things based upon what they wanted it to say, then it would be evident by going back to these early manuscripts. It's amazing that there are scholars who believe this garbage.
Good News   Monday, June 25, 2012
RAGrise
Good News, there is biblical evidence to support some of what Bean is saying by going back to the original manuscripts. The word baptize is the perfect example. I'll have Richie come in later and explain. He's my Greek guy and is much more eloquent when it comes to these things.
Richie & Ashley   Monday, June 25, 2012
GoodNews
Maybe I misread the comment. I sometimes struggle with understanding some people's posts. If we are talking about using synoptic words and minor meaning issues then yes, there is certainly preference brought into play. But when these heretical scholars come in and call into doubt major issues such as the "divinity of Jesus" over minor textual differences they are totally reaching. And wishing.
Good News   Monday, June 25, 2012
RAGrise
This is Richie. Too many times from the translations of the Bible, there have been words that are transliterated or a different meaning used. More specifically in the New Testament. The koine Greek, which is what the New Testament was originally written in, has many different translations for one word. But to touch on Ashley's point, the greek word, Baptizo, has only one meaning. The meaning means to immurse (i.e. submerge). It was proven that King James was sprinkled versus submerged under the water. I am not trying to start any argument here, but if you look at the actual meaning of the word, immersion wasn't practiced. Here's an instance in the New Testament where a word has more than one translation. Matthew 12:40. From the King James, it states "For Jonah was three days and three nights in the whale's belly, so shall the son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth" The "whale's belly" is actually 2 words in Greek used there. It was a transliteration of the LXX (Septuagint). In Jonah, the Hebrew words used there are "DAG GADOL", which means Large Fish, Large Sea Creature. In Greek, it was converted to Ketos Meglas. It can mean Large Sea Creature, Large Fish, Large Monster, Large Whale. Those words, Ketos Meglas, are used in Matthew 12:40. Science has proven that there were no whales, other than the killer whale in the Mediterranean's Sea around the time of Jonah. It's mouth isn't big enough to swallow a man. So we would need to agree that whale was probably not the best word used there. These are just many examples in the New Testament
Richie & Ashley   Tuesday, June 26, 2012
GoodNews
Makes sense to me. Thanks Richie. They are pretty minor differences when you boil them down. And the differences don't change the overall meaning or message. The great thing about God's Word is that there are so many synoptic messages given in so many different ways. How many different ways did Jesus say, I am the way, the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through me? Yet many people claim, that's not what He really meant. Or the divinity of Jesus. How many different ways did He claim to be divine? Kind of hard to use the "different meanings of a word" defense to say that He didn't really mean that when He says it 10 different ways. Thanks again for sharing your knowledge.
Good News   Tuesday, June 26, 2012
RAGrise
Personally I don't consider the difference between immersion and sprinkling to be a "minor difference". But other than that I understand what you're saying.....It's wonderful to have a husband who can read and understand Greek. it makes for more informed discussions. :)
Richie & Ashley   Tuesday, June 26, 2012
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